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Table 11 Typical analyses of KNR solids and electrolytes*

From: New views on the hypothesis of respiratory cancer risk from soluble nickel exposure; and reconsideration of this risk's historical sources in nickel refineries

  Weighta
Product Nickel Cobalt Copper Iron Arsenic before 1953 Arsenic after 1953 Sulphur
Matte as received 48 1.0 28 1.5 0.2 0.2 22
Cement copper slime 32 - 35 3.0 7.5 0.6 -
Cement copper 13 - 68 1.7 10.4 0.3 -
Herreshoff calcine 44 1.0 32 1.7 2.4d 0.2 0.7
Leached matteb 58 1.2 15 1.9 3.4d 0.3 0.9
Reduced matteb 71 1.3 19 1.5 4.0d 0.3 1.7
Nickel anodes 75 1.5 17 1.6 3.7d 0.3 1.1
Raw anode slime 30 0.8 27 4.5 3.0d 0.1 21
Roasted anode slime 36 0.9 30 5.0 2.0 0.1 1.1
Iron precipitate 1.2 - 1.2 39 0.4 4.0 -
Copper electrolyte 70 4.0 75 - - - -
Nickel anolytec 68 0.2 2.3 0.4 0.4 0.03 -
Nickel catholytec 68 0.2 Tre Tre Tre Tre -
  1. * Revised from Table eight in ICNCM (1990) [3]. a Composition of copper electrolyte, nickel anolyte, and nickel catholyte in grams per liter. Composition of other products expressed as percentage by weight. b So named for convenience. Actually "leached matte" is "leached calcine" and "reduced matte" is "reduced leached calcine." c Nickel electrolyte contained 160 g of nickel sulphate per liter without any nickel chloride before 1953. After 1953, most of the nickel sulphate was replaced by 95 g of nickel chloride per liter, leaving only 45 g of nickel sulphate per liter. d Revised by P. Thornhill. e Tr = trace.