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Table 2 Airborne concentrations of organic solvents in nail salons, combined occupational exposure of nail technicians during the “hot” and “cold season

From: Does the Low-level occupational exposure to volatile organic compounds alter the seasonal variation of selected markers of oxidative stress? A case–control study in nail technicians

  TWA-OEL “Hot” season “Cold” season
Ethanol [mg/m3] 1900 1.57 [0.06–16.12] 6.96 [0.35–54.77]****
Acetone [mg/m3] 600 0.81 [0.03–43.23] 0.57 [0.05–61.69]
Toluene [mg/m3] 100 0.02 [0.004–0.30] 0.01 [0.000–0.62]*
2-propanol (isopropyl alcohol) [mg/m3] 900 1.31 [0.11–21.30] 3.44 [0.12–37.70]**
2-butanone (methyl ethyl ketone) [mg/m3] 200 0.04 [0.007–0.92] 0.05 [0.002–1.63]
Ethyl acetate [mg/m3] 200 1.36 [0.07–27.28] 3.96 [0.03–44.54]*
Isopropyl acetate [mg/m3] 600 0.02 [0.010–0.10] 0.01 [0.000–0.22]****
n-butyl acetate [mg/m3] 200 0.23 [0.021–4.87] 0.17 [0.00–18.53]
Total [mg/m3] - 7.60 [0.57–70.62] 24.22 [1.55–132.28]****
Σ(Ci/Ni) 1.0 0.019 [0.002–0.170] 0.057 [0.002–0.254]***
  1. Airborne levels of organic solvents measured in air samples collected from nail salon workrooms during the “hot” (N = 45) and the “cold” (N = 64) season. Data presented as median [range] airborne concentrations were tested for significant inter-seasonal differences using the Mann–Whitney U test. TWA-OEL stands for the Polish time-weighted average occupational exposure limit of the respective organic solvent. Σ(Ci/Ni) stands for the ACGIH measure of the additive effect of combined exposure of the mixture of organic solvents, with respective threshold value equal 1
  2. * p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; *** p < 0.0005; **** p < 0.0001