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Table 1 The case criteria for nerve entrapments according to criteria modified from Nordander et al. 2009 and Ohlsson et al. 1994

From: Adverse health manifestations in the hands of vibration exposed carpenters - a cross sectional study

Nerve entrapment Criteria
Radiating neck complaints Pain radiating from the neck to the upper extremity, and limited/restricted neck movement, and radiating pain provoked by neck movement, and muscle weakness of the upper limb.
Thoracic outlet syndrome Pain radiating to the upper extremity, in the distribution of the ulnar nerve, and paraesthesia in the distribution of the ulnar nerve, and positive Roos test (increase in subjective symptoms, not only fatigue), and intense tenderness over the brachial plexus; diagnosis only if cervical syndrome is not present.
Pronator teres syndrome Pain in the medial/proximal part of the forearm, and local tenderness over the edge of the pronator teres, and decreased strength in pronation or flexion of the wrist or the distal phalanges of digit I-II.
Radial tunnel syndrome Pain in the elbow during rest, and tenderness about 2–3 in. distally of the lateral epicondyle, and pain in the proximal, lateral part of the forearm, and pain on resisted supination.
Ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow Pain and paraesthesia or numbness in the distribution of the ulnar nerve, and positive Tinel’s sign over the cubital tunnel.
Ulnar nerve entrapment in the wrist Pain and paraesthesia or numbness in the distribution of the ulnar nerve, and positive Tinel’s sign over Guyon’s tunnel (volar/ulnar at the wrist) or decreased strength in spreading the fingers.
Carpal tunnel syndrome Previous surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome, or numbness or tingling in digit I-III and a positive nerve entrapment test (Phalen’s test or Tinel’s sign).